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to encouraging stewardship of the environment, land conservation, watershed protection and eliminating harmful chemicals. additional funding provided by: the colcom foundation. the wallace genetic foundation and by the charles a. frueauff foundation. >> this week on "to the contrary" first, more women in the new congress including iraq war veteran tammy duckworth, then, -- outrage over a fatal gang rape of a woman in india, and declining birth rates in the u.s. ♪ >> hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to "to the contrary," a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, diversity in congress. the new congress is the most diverse ever with 20 women senators and 78 women in the house of representatives. the house democratic caucus has more women and people of color than it does white men, another historic first. we will explain what this means to you. but first we introduce you to one of those freshman. illinois democrat tammy duckworth, one of two female war veterans to be sworn in this week. the illinois democrat is the first double-amputee to serve in congress. the i
out space. it's so much easier to shut down a shop than it is in this environment. the colorado version of the law makes the law enforcement side of this much more challenging. >> and so the next thing that they could do is simply repeal it. and say if you're going to crack down on our regulatory system, we'll legalize without a regulatory system, then do what you can. >> you might notice that some of the initial ones were rebellious by nature. i think marijuana users describe themselves -- some of them have a distaste for it being legal because they're now abiding with the law. if what there is is a very aggressive response you're going to tap in their rebellious spirit. >> we're seeing a breakdown of a federal relationship. michael will give us a broader context than what we're seeing. >> there is a sort of tempting federalism prospect on this which sees something along the following lines. and angela alluded to this. look, the resurgence of american federalism because states have preferences here. there's no reason. let's experiment. i don't think that's necessarily wrong. bu
are two of his "ten predictions" for 2013. >> so the key, susie, is we're in an environment where stocks continue to climb walls of worry, and the economy continues to muddle through, not similar to last year. last year the economy some days okay, some days not so okay, and the stock market kept climbing that wall of worry. last year stocks were up 16%, s&p 500, and we only need about half that to achieve a new all-time high. i think we'll get there. >> susie: bob, how do markets go higher when the individual investor is out of the picture, so fearful of investing in stocks. do we see the return of the individual this year? >> i wish i could say we're going to see that, susie. but the individuals who own a lot of bonds first need to see bonds going down in price to be willing to sell them to buy stocks. i think we hit a new all-time high without much participation by the individual. it is the corporation itself that has the big burially since the become oof 09. >> susie: you believe the emerging markets are going to do better than the u.s. so should investors focus outside the u.s.? >> i
of russia being their sole supplier. in this environment, subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago, we thought that china and india, and other emerging economies, my sign-on to emissions reductions, and, therefore, that if we reduced emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. and i don't think it does but i don't tak take a position on whr mandated emissions caused global warming or not, but if we are reducing our emissions and china and india, which make up 37% of the worlds population, are not doing so, when i pointed any affect on the global temperatures. and then the first chapter of the book i talk about geoengineering solutions, that nobel prize-winning weiner thinks we can reduce global temperature if we just do it on our own. painting russ whitehurst like the sun's rays. what we are doing with a 12 and dollars were spent on alternative energy is pushing people into cars that they don't want to buy, we are raising electricity costs. we are -- we're getting rid of incandescent lightbulbs in favor of fluorescent lightbulbs. and the cost of this fal
environment, you will find this layer of chert. it's in all colors, purple, green, red, blue. it's a beautiful rock. . >> one thing i wanted to ask you, the review in the paper recently on sunday said that your book is different from all the other books about the anastazi because you brought out some of the non-flattering parts of their culture like violence. how did you conclude that they were a violent culture? . >> well, i didn't necessarily conclude they were a violent culture, i just concluded there was violence in their culture. the evidence is very clear where you find masker sites, where every place you drop a trench there are bodies, unburied bodies missing their heads, in some cases where there will be a head in one room and you can match it up to the body which is in another room 100 yards away and they didn't just end up there; somebody took the head off. and there will be places where it's all femurs, all gathered together. and places where it's obviously some kind of warfare event where people are all huddled into one spot and they have all been burned there. the record is very c
are two of his "ten predictions" for 2013. >> so the key, susie is we're in an environment where stocks continue to climb walls of worry, and the economy continues to muddle through, not similar to last year. last year the economy some days okay some days not so okay, and the stock market kept climbing that wall of worry. last year stocks were up 16%, s&p 500, and we only need about half that to achieve a new all-time high. i think we'll get there. >> susie: bob how do markets go higher when the individual investor is out of the picture so fearful of investing in stocks. do we see the return of the individual this year? >> i wish i could say we're going to see that susie. but the individuals who own a lot of bonds first need to see bonds going down in price to be willing to sell them to buy stocks. i think we hit a new all-time high without much participation by the individual. it is the corporation itself that has the big burially since the become ofof 09. >> susie: you believe the emerging markets are going to do better than the u.s. so should investors focus outside the u.s.? >> i th
, and kick the tires. it's a non-sales pressure environment, in other words, no one here is trying to sell you a car. you can actually come in here, sit down and you're not going to be hassled. if you want to come to the show, it runs today through sunday, 10:00 to 10:00 every day. except on sunday, they go to 6:00. >> just looking. >>> meteorologist christina loren certainly not convertible weather. >> certainly not. you're going to get a windchill that you do not want to feel hitting you in the face. good morning to you. we do have a pretty good-looking day shaping up. most of the cloud cover is starting to clear out of the bay area. that means clear skies are going to lead to a very cold start tomorrow morning. we have lingering activity. it's very spotty. you can see from our northern california radar picture. we have some spotty cells to moisture lingering around the bay area. this is where the snow ended up. look at this. big sur, the surrounding mountains, yeah, they picked up snow down to potentially 1,000 feet. we're going to have to wait to get everything confirmed from the natio
, and eucalyptus. chill out and this environment and you might see butterflies and dandelions. blue jays fly between the eucalyptus. it is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. six, 24, or 71 bus. we have conquered the steps, we walked the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view the park has to offer. this is the place to take someone special and enjoyed a beautiful look out. " come to corona heights, located in the heart of this district. it offers a spectacular view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. the park is one of the best kept secrets. unlike twin peaks, it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. hop on a 37 bus to get there with that any parking worries. locals can bring their dogs to run with other dogs. there is also grass for small dogs. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place for the city to provide these kind of parks. the dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice the wildflowers on the grassland. and keep your head on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. take your camera and be prepared to
in every school is something that will enhance the learning environment, and that's our first responsibility inside of school, is the learning environment. you don't want to make this an armed camp for kids. i don't think that's a positive example for children. we should be able to figure out some other ways to enhance safety. >> new jersey governor chris christie. my next guest says armed guards are exactly what american schools need. in the wake of sandy hook elementary school massacre, sheriff joe arpaio has called for armed volunteers to patrol about 50 schools in his jurisdiction. welcome to you, sheriff. >> how are you doing, piers? >> explain to me why you believe that the answer to these gun massacres is to have a lot more guns. >> well, you know, i'm not going to get into that. we have many, many laws pertaining to guns already. we ought to enforce those laws, but i'm taking immediate action. i have a volunteer posse made up of 3,500 armed, well trained, 100 hours of training. we just finished another program at the malls. very successful. so why not utilize and mobil
a short break. if you feel like you work in a toxic environment but don't know what to do about it -- how is that for a segue? ken linder written a new book called "your killer emotions." best way to navigate your way is to keep emotions in check. we'll talk to him, up next. geico's emergency roadside assistance is there 24/7. oh dear, i got a flat tire. hmmm. uh... yeah, can you find a take where it's a bit more dramatic on that last line, yeah? yeah i got it right here. someone help me!!! i have a flat tire!!! well it's good... good for me. what do you think? geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. >>> everybody has a moment where you get upset and you do something you regret. our next guest says he knows how to control those urges and lead to a successful personally at work. he has a new book "your killer emotions: seven steps to mastering the toxic impulses that sabotage you." good morning. >> good morning, soledad. >> i'm guessing you work with hostile people on both sides of the negotiation and there are lots of people who think anger and emot
the right environment for conducting elections without interference and without undue concerns in that regard for the afghan people. we also discussed in a bit of detail and in the environment that we have all aspects of the bilateral security agreement between afghanistan and the united states, and i informed the president that the afghan people already in the -- called for the strategic partnership agreement between us and the united states have given their approval to this relationship and they value it as one that is good for afghanistan. so in that context the bilateral security agreement is one that the afghan people approve and i'm sure we will conduct it in detail where both the interests of the united states and the interests of afghanistan will be kept in mind. we had a number of other issues also to talk about. during our conversations and perhaps many times in that conversation beginning with the conversation of course i thanked the president for the help that the united states has given to the afghan people for all that we have gained in the past 10 years and that
and suing each other? >> yeah, not suing each other, but in a very, messy policy environment, and i just want to add one thing to this, and i don't know whether we disagree on this, but you see this more and more frequently that the administration, precisely because it knows that congress won't do anything, makes policy by official announcements of law enforcement, so we're going to have our own de facto dream act which congress refuses to enact by administrative law enforcement. that's very clear example of the dynamics here. you might see the same thing in drug enforcement, not going to enforce it, period, because congress won't enact a law to that effect. i find that sort of to go much beyond the ordinary exercise of administrative and executive discretion in law enforcement. it's policymaking by law enforcement which is to my mind a very, very -- in the teeth of congressional statutes to the contrary, i there are real policy difficulties with that, but there are also real constitutional problems with that. it's just sort of one more sign off dysfunction. >> not the way things are sup
in this current fiscal environment to ensure the success of the space launch? >> thank you, sir. that is a tall order. i think one of the crucial things the consolation program was supposed to do is to provide a smooth transition for the work force and for the capability the nation has off of the shuttle program to what ever came next. and we've lost that now. the deep integration between the low earth orbit and the destinations that was hoped for i think is also gone. i would first say 2012 is not 2008. we are in a different and new situation today and we have to look at going forward. the primary, one of the primary problems with the end of the constellation was again cutting ourselves off from our international partners who didn't see how they were going to participate increasing risks to the international space station because while we certainly hope for and encourage and want to see the private sector to go for that work if there are delays, if there are problems, we don't really have a fallback option so we are down to a few critical paths for supporting the station, and so, the complemen
you would look at the material? >> we are all products of our experience, of our environment where we come from. i have been tempered by that experience about war. what war means, the consequences, who has to fight it. all of that experience is part of me and how i look at policy, how i look at our foreign policy, how i look at our military policy, how i judge consequences, how the world sees us, their trust in our purpose, in our power. no question that much of the questioning i've done about iraq even before we went in was conditioned tempered by that experience in vietnam. and whatever i will do in my life, whether it's in politics or outside, those experiences shape me just like anyone who has gone through war, those experiences shape you very much. one of the things it does is it makes you less inclined i suspect to jump into war. it's easy to get into war, not very easy to get out as evidenced by the johnson tapes. and you need to think through these things. diplomacy is critically important especially in the world we flive today. i think something else is important here and cer
to live in that stressful environment. >> bill: you needed to get out of there to clean up? >> that's what ended up happening. i have had the longest period of sobriety since leaving. >> bill: how did you get off? >> i went to rehab. but i went to many rehabs. how did i stay off is more the question. >> bill: okay, go. >> well, i got married. had a family. had children. i have relationships that are more meaningful in my life today like my cousin chris, than the superficial relationships that i spent most of my time nurturing polit. >> bill: did you go like he did into a structure into a crew this is what you have to do? >> to the best evidence based crossing anyive behavior which is 12 step program. deal with it every single day. >> bill: the book, recover to live, if anybody out there has a problem or knows people who do. check this out. gentlemen, would appreciate you coming. in did you a noble thing. >> appreciate it. >> bill: bernie goldberg on the ethics of printing the names of legal gun owners in the newspaper. berne is is next. did you know wh heartburn, it's tolate to take prilos
are actually behind the counter in dispensaries, and so it's a very safe, secure, highly regulated environment that we operate in. >> okay. so 18 states have now passed medical marijuana laws. 18 states, so you -- you operate -- you operate already in california. you operate in canada. you've got dispensers coming to market in arizona in a matter of weeks. >> correct. >> what when are you likely to break into the remaining states? what's the plan for growth? >> that's a very good question because we are not just about medical marijuana. our technology crosses many boundaries in the traditional pharmacy retailing business, whether it's retail pharmacies, institutional pharmacy plays, doctor offices, hospice, long-term care, so our solution really is very broad scope and has a tremendous value proposition in traditional pharmacy and in traditional health care. in terms of medical marijuana we are on a state-by-state awareness, put if in aware ney. every state sen acting its own laws and regulations so we're currently enacting the rules in recently passed state like connecticut and massachusetts.
out of your comfort zone, the environment is so rich. >> by the same token, people who might be liberals or conservatives do at least have an enemy they can identify with, which was not always possible in the age of walter cronkite. with one solo voice. >> that had enemies, they just were not on television. when you think about it, consider walter cronkite, known to many in the day as uncle walter. it would be ludicrous to call any newscaster a relative today. can you imagine anybody trying to get away with a presumptuous statement like "and that's the way it is." everybody craved the comfort of that dinnertime slice of consensus reality. i think that the more media do you think cable tv and that that kind of comfort? >> i think that the more media sources you have dividing up the audience, the smaller the public square becomes. less consensus, but you are exchanging that comfort for the comfort of knowing that there are other people like you in the world who care about the things that you care about. i am always in favor of more speech, rather than less, even though everythi
are naturally curious and are willing to venture out of your comfort zone, the environment is so rich. if you want to be hermetically sealed, that option is available to you, too. >> people who might be liberals or conservatives to at least have an enemy they can identify with which was not an pot -- which was not possible in the age of walter cronkite, with one solo voice of television mainstream journalism. >> they had enemies, they were just not on television. consider walter cronkite. known to many in the day as uncle walter. it would be little as -- ludicrous to call in the news anger and relative to date. it would be arrogant to end every newscast with the phrase, "and that's the way it is." can you imagine anybody try to get away with that presumptuous statement? yet it was his sign off and everybody believed it and quit the comfort of that dinner time slice of consensus reality. >> do you think cable tv and the that kind of comfort -- ended that kind of comfort? >> not initially. the more media sources you have dividing up the audience, the smaller the public prayer becomes. the let's
risk than upside. but clearly, munis, especially in the increased tax environment, still attractive as are some high-yield, some floating rate including some private debt alternative investments to provide some current yield while we continue to sort of muddle along during this first quarter or so in the volatility. hover orr all right, jack, i know you have a lot of etf picks which you often share with us. what is your investment philosophy, strategy in terms of specifics right now? >> sure. i can't disagree with david. i think a lot of those themes, you know, pretty much filter through to what we're doing. but we do think that the emerging markets, you know, trading at a 25% discount to the s&p 500 offer a little bit of insulation in the event that we start our austerity program this year, europe continues their austerity program. yes, there is a little stimulus in japan, but overall i would like to invest in an economy that has, you know, a 6% overnight interest rate that can go lower if they need to. they're running budget surpluses, they've got currency reserves, they can throw
diversity and we are in a tough political environment. with key cabinet picks already announced, the defense, state, and cia, the shift is now on others. >> does he settle on these names or still sifting through tough choices? >> he will make an announcement when he makes a decision. >> reporter: timothy geithner is expected to leave and although wall street and progressives are he can pressed concerns. someone with business expertise and with lisa jackson departing the environmental protection agency, a replacement is needed for her, too. it's a second-term ritual that douglas brinkley is often -- >> they pick people they wish they could have picked the first time around but you can't with the politics of a campaign when you're first making to the white house. >> reporter: climate is still a factor. susan rice withdrew her name to replace hillary clinton under pressure over her actions after the benghazi attacks. >> i think the political climate matters a lot now with who you pick. it shouldn't but it does. >> reporter: and there's pressure under the president to consider diversity after a
and also the competitive environment. obviously a lot of phones coming out at ces and across the spectrum. but let's be clear. a lot of work hard for nokia. 0% gain is not necessarily the start of a turnaround per se at this company. >> and morgan stanley, if you're thinking about buy microsoft, windows 8 disappointing. i do like to -- a lot of people call in on mad money, they want to talk about low dollar stocks. clearwire. nokia. supervalu, all big wins. typically speculation -- speculation is really bad, we have to be involved with pfizer, you know, you should be in merck. the percentage wins here are staggering and a lot of people hit it big. by the way, sirius worked out, too. >> at the same time when you have a low priced stock like that, there is a great deal of risk and i know you point that out many times. i won't enmention many of these until they pierce that $3 level. >> but i was skeptical and this is one of those rare times where skepticism for supervalu, skepticism for clearwire because it was at a dollar not take long ago and it turns out they're a very valuable company. >
is to continue to keep people at home in an environment that they feel most comfortable with as opposed to an institution. so we measure in our organization readmission rates. i mentioned that we've reduced 26% readmission rates. the goal there is to continue to encourage people to stay home and be able to take care of them at home. that helps with that waste in that regard. the ability to not have duplicated diagnostic services are an example of that. and someone overlooking the whole individual has that observation as opposed to the silos. >> but we go back to the medicare for a second? >> uh-huh. >> where is that waste, and what have you seen as an organization the waste being and how would you suggest that that be tackled? >> okay. um, the waste is across the platform. i mean, i think if you this week there was an article in "the new york times" around fraud and some of the activities that are going on in that area. so fraud's a component of that. but for us as an organization the largest waste is the lack of integrated care. and what that means is duplication of services and where
a shop than it is in a -- [inaudible] environment. and the version of the colorado law makes the law enforcement side much more challenging. >> so the next thing a state could do is simply repeal, right? and say, well, if you're going to crack down on a regulatory system, we'll legalize without a regulatory system, and do what you can. >> you might notice that i think some of the initial efforts were a bit rebellious by nature. every marijuana user just -- [inaudible] i think some of them have a distaste for this becoming legal because now they're abiding with the law. [laughter] so i think what there is is a very aggressive response. you are going to see much more aggressive versions of the law, and by that i mean versions of just repeal. >> it's interesting, what we're seeing here is in some ways the breakdown of a federal/state law enforcement partnership in which the feds rely very heavily on the states which leads us to michael greve who will give us some broader context on what we're seeing unfold here. >> right. i'm against partnerships, and i'll explain why. there is a sort o
only voted for obama. that kind of sets up a much more friendly environment to talk about the issues. host: fawn johnson, correspondent with national journal, we're focusing the "washington journal" this morning on issues surrounding immigration. later on, we'll talk to some reporters as well as folks on both sides of the issue right here on n washington, d.c. our first phone call is from ryan in texas on our democrats line. hi, ryan. caller: yes, how you doing? host: good. caller: i would like to say, they're not going to enforce the immigration laws. some of the people that i know out with these charges, that they're not going to follow immigration rules, just some of these guys that got these crack charges and trying to get back to their families. host: you're talking about drug charges? ok. let's go to trevor in arlington, virginia, on our independent line. hi, trevor. caller: hello. how you doing? host: good morning. caller: basically the premise of my question is, you know, everybody involved in deciding what's going to happen with immigration, you would think they would have t
because of the -- of an environment that says, anything goes. so there's a reason for regulations. not just to stifle business. the police we see on their corneres are an example of regulation. that same idea goes up and beyond that. the financial things as well. >> host: ken in atlanta, georgia. you're on the air. >> caller: good afternoon, gentlemen, this is just a treat. just a real pleasure to hear you and i've got some good news for you. right now, on youtube, there's a seven and a half minute film narrated by former president of georgia tech, incidentally georgia tech won the ball game the other day -- but georgia tech's president, the name of this film is, all american citizen team. and it is an effort that the georgia general assembly has been involved in since the 1970s, and we found out that there is a problem and it takes us back to a country western song, looking for love in all the wrong places. >> guest: one of our favorites. >> caller: we don't have problem with the government and we don't have a problem with elected officials. the problem turns out to be the folks
or attempts on his life three times and operates in a very difficult political environment and has an insurgency going. so i think if you put all of those factors in play, suddenly you get a better measure of the kind of what he has facing him. i'm not saying that president karzai is a perfect leader. but what i'm saying is we should try to understand that context and i think it can allow us to deal better with a leader like him? >> in your book you write this about the afghan president. hamid karzai was a man of strong emotions and loyalties rubbed raw sometimes to cynicism by long years and slowed to trust but chited to relationships. you spent a lot of travel time with him. bottom line, is he doing what he needs to do? >> well, i'm not on the ground to junl the current activities but i think he's doing what he thinks he has to do, and that is navigate a western coalition that is very skeptical of the mission and desirous of pulling out, dealing with a taliban insurgency and then internal politics. so i think if you really look at his challenge, he's walking a tight rope in a sti
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)

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